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Spots on Ceres even stranger

Ceres’ spots remain mysterious
[Via BBC News – Science & Environment]

The team behind Nasa’s Dawn mission to Ceres releases striking new images, but remains unable to explain the dwarf planet’s most intriguing mystery.

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Some amazing new pictures do little to solve what those shiny white spots are. 

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I’ve had fun with this before. Landing strip. Maybe a site for  monolith.

But what it really is remains elusive. Look at this picture of Ceres (a resolution of 400 m per pixel):

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The crater is that large blob of green in the red background around 240º. Occator.

Now look at this one which gives insights into the mineral content of the surface:

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Occator stands out now, as a light blue circle with a black spot in the center.

Right where the monolith is.

Image: Keith Breazeal